Norangi; Splashed with Sulfuric Acid

CARE Korea is no longer a Sponsored Project of World Animal Rescue Fund.
This post is translated from a post on their website, and was not written by us.
Norangi had been taken in by a 70-year-old lady who regularly brought meals to the stray cats in her neighborhood. Then one day, Norangi, who was much loved, came home writhing with a horrendous wound.

Norangi had been taken in by a 70-year-old lady who regularly brought meals to the stray cats in her neighborhood. Then one day, Norangi, who was much loved, came home writhing with a horrendous wound.

Norangi’s owner, who received only a basic old-age pension, had provided stray cats their meals with her meager income. A young man in the neighborhood who had watched her with disapproval had approached her once to show her a small bottle. He threatened multiple times, “Do you know what this bottle holds? If you keep feeding these stray cats, I will pour sulfuric acid on them!”

“If you keep feeding these stray cats, I will pour sulfuric acid on them!”

Though she was frightened, Norangi’s owner could not let the cats go hungry and continued to feed them. She did not expect anything so terrifying would actually happen.

Then, one day, Norangi returned home with third-degree burns on her body and melted skin on her belly and sides. The damage to her skin was so extreme her insides were about to spill out.

It’s not the cats’ fault that they don’t have homes to go to; they are victims of disinterest and neglect even before someone decides that they should be punished for their homelessness. Click To Tweet

The old lady went to the police, but they turned her away, saying, “There is not enough evidence for an investigation.”

All she could do was apply disinfectant to Norangi’s wounds. But over time, the wounds started to give off a foul-smelling discharge. Norangi was able to get emergency surgery with financial help from her owner’s friend who took pity on their situation. However, the traumatized cat distrusted humans and would not come out from under the bed. However, because of the lack of adequate medical care, the sutured area underwent necrosis. Unable to watch her cat suffer, Norangi’s owner desperately reached out to CARE Korea.

Our rescue team quickly took Norangi to a vet, and after examining Norangi’s wound, the vet concluded that the burn was of a chemical nature. Animals, like humans, feel pain. It is difficult to imagine the agony Norangi is in, given that burns are considered to be one of the most painful kinds of wounds.

It is enraging that such barbaric abuse has occurred yet again.

What is it with stray cats? Why do people feel it’s OK to attack or abuse them? It’s not the cats’ faults that they don’t have homes to go to; they are victims of disinterest and neglect even before someone decides that they should be punished for their homelessness.

For many old people, their pets are often their only companions, and on a basic pension, vet bills are impossible for them to pay. Without treatment, these pensioners may be forced to watch their companions die a slow and painful death. That’s why attacks like these are disgusting on more than one level.

If you’d like to help rescue more animals like Norangi, please consider making a donation.

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CARE Korea

CARE Korea

CARE Korea is a South Korean animal rights nonprofit that rescues, shelters, and rehomes abused and abandoned animals, mainly from the dog meat industry in South Korea.

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